The Pet Industry Association demands exacting standards from our members to ensure the welfare of animals and promote responsible pet ownership.

Supporting the industry through advocacy

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What we believe

The Pet Industry Association is the only industry association in Australia created to represent all businesses in the pet industry. Formed in 1979 as the PIJAC, we have evolved into a peak organisation which aims to create an environment of best practice principles and ongoing learning for improved technology and systems in the pet industry. The Pet Industry Association is run by members for its members and offers a voice for all who join by liaising with governments, animal welfare agencies, as well as pet and animal groups nationally and internationally. We are represented on government steering committees, consultation and advisory groups on pet ownership and industry issues around Australia.

To promote, support and represent a sustainable pet industry because we recognise that pets and their welfare are essential for a healthy society.

This ensures our members thrive and our Association continues to represent the majority of the industry.

The PIAA National Code of Practice and Code of Ethics are quality standards for the operation of businesses in the pet industry supply chain. The Code sets standards that exceed current regulatory requirements. Compliance with the code is a mandatory requirement for membership of the PIAA. An Ethics and Complaints Committee adjudicates any complaints against activity deemed in contravention of the code.
PIAA is a member of the Australian Companion Animal Council and is represented on and works with Aquatic committees nationally, including OFMJG and the NSW Ornamental Fish Reference Group, Animal Welfare Advisory Committees in QLD, NSW, NT and the ACT, the Domestic Animal Management Implementation Committee in Victoria and the Dog & Cat Management Board in South Australia. We’ve also worked closely with the governments in QLD, NSW and SA on pet shop codes of practice. PIAA also holds a seat on the NSW Government’s Companion Animals Taskforce.

Latest news

What is the Queensland Dog Breeder Register?

What is the Queensland Dog Breeder Register?The Queensland Government has introduced new laws to promote the responsible breeding of dogs. These new laws will provide the tools – including a Dog Breeder Register – to help locate breeders who place profit before the welfare of their dogs.

When does the Queensland Dog Breeder Register begin?
The Animal Management (Protecting Puppies) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 commences on 26 May 2017. You will be able to register as a breeder on the Queensland Dog Breeder Register from the 26 May 2017.

If puppies or dogs born before 26 May 2017 are being given away, sold, supplied or advertised, do they need to be registered?
No. The legislation does not apply to dogs born before 26 May 2017.

What happens after I register?
When you become registered as a dog breeder, you will be issued with a Breeder Identification Number (BIN) which is the supply number for every dog you breed. This supply number must be included in the microchip details for each dog you breed and be displayed when a dog is given away, supplied, sold or advertised.

Your registration is for 12 months and if you want to continue breeding dogs, you will need to renew your registration annually.

If your registration details change, you must update your registration details within 7 days of the changes coming into effect.

Can I search the Queensland Dog Breeder Register by breeder name?
No. You must use the full supply number to search the Queensland Dog Breeder Register. If you do not have the full supply number; the supply number is not valid or it cannot be found in the Queensland Dog Breeder Register then you should submit a concern. You can do this on the Queensland Dog Breeder Register or by ringing the department on 13 25 23.

Will the Queensland Dog Breeder Register cover cats?
No. The new law and the Queensland Dog Breeder Register does not apply to cats.

Supply numbers and approved entities

What does “supply” mean?
The term “supply” is legally defined to include:

  • exchange, give or sell;
  • offer or agree to supply;
  • Cause or allow (permit) a supply; or
  • possess for supply.

What is a supply number?
A supply number can be any one of the following:

  • A Breeder Identification Number (BIN)
  • A membership number provided by an approved breeder organisation that accredits dog breeders, and is approved by the Minister as an “approved entity”.
  • A breeder permit number provided by an approved local government that issues permits/registrations to dog breeders, and is approved by the Minister as an “approved entity”.
  • A unique number that identifies a person as a recognised interstate breeder, provided by their state government.

A Breeder Exemption Number (BEN) – applicable only if:

  • you are a primary producer who has a working dog that you did not breed and wish to supply the dog for purposes other than as a working dog

OR

  • you are a person who is the owner of, or responsible for, the dog and you did not breed the dog, and you do not conduct a business activity that includes the supply of dogs.

Will the Queensland Dog Breeder Register allow a person that breeds on alternate years to retain and use the same supply number?
Yes. Although registration is only current for twelve months, the Queensland Dog Breeder Register recognises previously registered breeders and has the capability to re-issue the same Breeder Identification Number (BIN) for subsequent registrations.

What organisations can provide a supply number?
To provide a valid supply number an organisation must be approved by the Minister as an “approved entity”. To be approved, an organisation must meet certain criteria. If the Minister approves an organisation as an “approved entity”, that organisation’ membership, permit or registration numbers will be recognised as supply numbers.

What is the purpose of approved entities?
Approved entities will manage their member details on the Queensland Dog Breeder Register. This will mean that those members will not need to register directly on the Queensland Dog Breeder Register and removes duplication of registration.

Registering as a breeder

Do I need to register?
A breeder is any person who has, or is responsible for, any female dog that has a litter. It does not matter how many dogs are owned, and the breed of the dog is not relevant.

Can children register as a breeder?
No. Children under 18 may not register as a breeder. In these circumstances the parent or guardian of the child must register as a breeder.

I only have a litter or two of puppies each year as a hobby – am I considered a breeder?
Yes. You must register as a breeder if you have, or are responsible for, a dog that has a litter.

What do I do if my dog is already pregnant when the laws begin?
Once the law begins, you will need to register as a breeder and get a supply number within 28 days of the litter being born.

I don’t make money from my dogs. I give them away to family, friends or neighbours – am I considered a breeder?
Yes. You must register as a breeder if you have, or are responsible for, a dog that has a litter.

My dog is pregnant by accident – an unplanned litter – am I considered a breeder?
Yes. You must register as a breeder if you have, or are responsible for, a dog that has a litter.

If I temporarily supply my male dog for breeding purposes, do I need a supply number?
No. The law only applies to a female dog that gives birth to a litter.

I only want to breed one litter so I can keep one of the puppies – can I get an exemption?
No. You must register as a breeder if you have, or are responsible for, a dog that has a litter.

Why do the regulations cover non-commercial breeders?
It is important that every breeder (except for those exempted, such as breeders of genuine working dog) is registered to help ensure irresponsible breeders can be identified and action can be taken to ensure the welfare of the dogs.

What if I have a dog I did not breed and I want to give it to another person?
If the dog does not have a supply number, before this dog is given away, supplied, advertised or sold you must create an account online and apply for a Breeder Exemption Number (BEN).

Interstate and overseas breeders


I am a registered breeder under another state/territory’s laws – do I have to register in Queensland?
Only if the transaction occurs in Queensland. If the transaction occurs in another state and the dog is transported to Queensland afterwards, this new Queensland legislation does
not apply.

If the transaction takes place in Queensland and you are registered under another state/territory’s laws (and you have a unique identification number), you do not need to register in Queensland – but you must use that identification number as your supply number in Queensland.

I am a member of a dog breeder association in another state/territory – can I use my membership number as a supply number in Queensland?
You can only use your membership number as a supply number in Queensland if your breeder association is recognised under that state/territory’s law.

I don’t live in Queensland and I breed dogs outside of Queensland for supply within Queensland – must I register?
Yes. All dogs supplied within Queensland must have a supply number if advertised, sold or given away and the supply number must be included in their mandatory microchip information.

If I buy a dog from overseas, must it have a supply number?
No. If the transaction occurs outside Queensland’s borders, a supply number is not required when bringing the dog into Queensland. However, you must apply for a supply number and provide it if the dog is advertised, sold or given to another person in Queensland.

Does the requirement to register as a breeder in Queensland cover dogs bred for export?
Yes. While the export of dogs is covered by the Federal Government, all dog breeders in Queensland, including those breeding for export, will be required to register to breed and comply with all the requirements.

Pet shops, pounds and shelters

Will the sale of dogs through pet shops be banned?
Provided pet shops comply with the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001, as well as the new laws being introduced on 26 May 2017, dogs and puppies can be sold through pet shops.

Will pet shops sell my puppies if I’m not registered?
No. Under these new laws, it is illegal for a pet shop to give away, supply, sell or advertise puppies without a supply number identifying you as the breeder.

Can I still sell my puppies online, privately or through a pet shop?
Yes. However, from 26 May 2017, if you sell a dog or puppy through a pet shop or retailer, they must use the supply number identifying you as the breeder.

If someone else gives away, supplies, sells or advertises your puppies, they must use the supply number identifying you as the Breeder.

From 26 May 2017, it is a breach of the law to give away, supply, sell or advertise a dog or puppies without a supply number that identifies the origin of the dog.

I operate a pound/shelter for homeless or lost dogs – do I need to register?
Yes. Pounds and shelters, which are likely to come into possession of pregnant females or  abandoned dogs or puppies, need to be registered.

Are vet surgeries acting as shelters to rehome animals expected to apply for r egistration?
Yes. All shelters will need to register if they wish to supply dogs that do not have a supply number. This includes veterinary surgeries that act as a shelter for rehoming dogs.

Do pets for sale in public view need to have breeder ID and sire/dam details displayed?
No. The display of the parentage of the dogs being sold is not a requirement under the new laws. Pet shops do need to display the supply number, identifying the breeder, for any puppies provided or advertised for sale.

Working dogs

I am a primary producer breeding working dogs – am I considered a breeder?
Primary producers that breed working dogs do not have to register as breeders, as long as they supply all puppies to other primary producers as working dogs.

However, primary producers who breed working dogs must register as a breeder if they supply any dogs for purposes other than as working dogs.

What is the definition of a working dog?
A working dog means a dog usually kept or proposed to be kept on rural land by an owner who is a primary producer, or a person engaged or employed by a primary producer.

The dog is to be kept primarily for the purpose of droving, protecting, tending, or working stock, or is being trained in droving, protecting, tending, or working stock.

I am breeding from my working dog and will be providing a puppy to another person as a pet – do I need to register?
You must register as a breeder if you are a breeder of a working dog and a puppy will be supplied to a person other than a primary producer, or will not be used as a working dog (e.g. sold to a neighbour as a pet).

Are pig-dogs considered to be a ‘working dog’?
No. Under the law, the definition of a working dog is limited to working dogs kept on rural land for droving, protecting, tending or working stock. It does not include managing feral animals.

Our property owners are using pigging dogs as their mustering dogs – do they have to register?
This would need to be determined on a case by case basis by the local government. The definition of ‘working dog’ is narrow and does not include pigging dogs or any dogs used for hunting. However, if a working dog was also used to hunt pigs the exemption may apply.

If a working dog has 8 pups does that mean they need to have 8 exemption numbers?
No. Primary producers that breed working dogs do not have to register as breeders, as long as they supply all puppies to other primary producers as working dogs. However, primary producers must register as a breeder if they breed working dogs but supply any dogs for purposes other than as working dogs.

Are guard dogs kept for property protection on rural land exempt?
No. The definition of ‘working dog’ is limited to dogs kept on rural land for droving, protecting, tending or working stock.

Are dogs kept for guarding livestock on rural land exempt?
Yes. Dogs used to protect stock meet the definition of a working dog.

What if the dogs are protecting crops? Are they a working dog?
No. The definition of ‘working dogs’ is quite narrow and does not include dogs kept for protecting crops.

What if the dog is sold as a working dog e.g. a cattle dog but is found unsuited and becomes a non-working pet with another owner - what happens as no supply number was given at purchase?
In this instance, the person supplying the dog for purposes outside the definition of ‘working dog’ must register and obtain a Breeder Exemption Number before they rehome the dog.

Is the breed of dog relevant to the definition of ‘working dog’?
No. The definition does not include a breed, just the purposes for which the dog is kept.

Penalties and reporting

Is there a penalty if I sell my puppies and I’m not registered and don’t have a supply number?
Yes. It is an offence if you fail to register as a breeder and you are giving away, supplying, selling or advertising your dog’s puppies born on or after 26 May 2017 without a supply number.

Is it an offence to use someone else’s supply number?
Yes. It is an offence to use another person’s supply number for a dog you have bred.

However, if you are supplying a dog you have not bred to another person you must use the supply number of the person who bred the dog.

What happens to the dogs if a breeder’s registration is cancelled or suspended?
If a breeder’s registration is cancelled or suspended the puppies they have bred may be given to a pound or shelter who will be able to use the pound/shelter’s supply number to rehome the dogs.

If a breeder’s registration is cancelled or suspended, any other dogs they did not breed which need to be rehomed must have a Breeder Exemption Number (BEN) as a supply number.

If there are animal welfare concerns, actions may be taken with respect to the dogs under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001.

Will the address and contact details of breeders be available to local government?
Yes. Local government officers appointed under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 will have access to breeder details on the Queensland Dog Breeder Register. However, this is only for the purposes of performing functions under this act or the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001.

The public will not have access to all of a breeder’s details. Only the breeder’s name, accreditation number, the date their accreditation ends, their local government area and either their telephone number or email address will be publicly accessible. This information can only be searched by using the supply number supplied with a dog.

How can I make a complaint about a breeder with no supply number?
The Queensland Dog Breeder Register allows you to lodge concerns about a breeder or the welfare of a dog, and this information will be referred to the appropriate authorities for action.

You can report an unregistered breeder or a person supplying a puppy without a supply number through the Queensland Dog Breeder Register, or through your relevant local government.

Are there mandatory breeder standards?
Biosecurity Queensland is working with RSPCA Qld, Dogs Queensland and Queensland Racing Integrity Commission to develop the draft Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Breeding Dogs and their Progeny (Standards).

A number of key animal welfare issues will be considered during this process. Once finalised, the Standards will be adopted as compulsory under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001. All dog breeders in Queensland, including working dog breeders, will have to comply with the Standards.

Costs

What will it cost to register as a breeder to obtain a supply number?
There is currently no fee to register as a breeder.

What about microchipping?
There will be no extra cost for microchipping, as mandatory microchipping already applies to dogs from 12 weeks of age, or when supplied (if earlier).

The supply number identifying the origin of the dog will be included in the microchip information of the dog. This allows lifetime traceability of the dog to the breeder. Certain dogs, such as genuine working dogs, are exempt from microchipping.

For more information, please call 13 25 23

Things your groomer wishes you know

We hope this will give you a better understanding of what a dog groomer deals with everyday and you can look to find ways to make the grooming experience easier for the groomer as well as smoother for your dog.

There are many things to learn and consider when it comes to pet grooming both for the owner and the groomer.

Q: What should you consider when looking for a dog groomer? 

Does the groomer have any certification or qualifications? How many years experience do they have? Do they have experience with different breeds or are there services limited to basic clip downs? Do they specialise in any breed or skill such as hand scissoring, longer styling, stripping etc? These factors and more can influence the pricing and time it takes to complete the service and whether the groomer is suited to your needs.
We hope this will give you a better understanding of what a dog groomer deals with everyday and you can look to find ways to make the grooming experience easier for the groomer as well as smoother for your dog.

There are many things to learn and consider when it comes to pet grooming both for the owner and the groomer.

Q: What should you consider when looking for a dog groomer?

Does the groomer have any certification or qualifications? How many years experience do they have? Do they have experience with different breeds or are there services limited to basic clip downs? Do they specialise in any breed or skill such as hand scissoring, longer styling, stripping etc? These factors and more can influence the pricing and time it takes to complete the service and whether the groomer is suited to your needs.

View the full story here at Australian Dog Lover

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