Canberra set to recognise animals as ‘sentient beings’ that are able to feel and perceive in an Australian first.

Pet owners who keep their dogs locked up and do not allow them to exercise for longer than one day could face a fine of up to $4,000 under sweeping changes that enshrine animal feelings into ACT law. Key points: New laws include harsher fines for mistreatment Fines will apply for injuring an animal and not reporting it — including hitting a kangaroo Under the new laws people can legally break into cars to protect animals Under the bill, confinement is judged on the dog’s size, age and physical condition. And anyone found confining a dog for longer than 24 hours would have to provide two hours of exercise or pay the fine. But provisions do exist within the legislation for reasonable restraints, such as chicken coops, bird cages and cat containment areas. Under the proposed laws the ACT would become the first jurisdiction in the country to recognise animals as “sentient beings” — the idea that animals are able to feel and perceive the world. The concept recognises that “animals have intrinsic value and deserve to be treated with compassion” and “people have a duty to care for the physical and mental welfare of animals”. “The science tells us that animals are sentient,” ACT City Services Minister Chris Steel said. “I know with my dog he gets very excited when we’re about to go on a run. “I think most dog owners, most cat owners know their animals do feel emotion.” The animal welfare amendments, to be introduced into the ACT Legislative Assembly this week, would establish a suite of additional offences, including hitting or kicking an animal,...

Selling or giving away a cat or dog? – The rules have changed in NSW

From 1 July 2019, people advertising kittens, cats, puppies or dogs for sale or to give away in NSW will need to include an identification number in advertisements.  The identification number can be either: a microchip number a breeder identification number, OR a rehoming organisation number. The rules will apply to all advertisements, including those in newspapers, local posters, community notice boards and all forms of online advertising, including public advertisements on websites such as the Trading Post, Gumtree and social media sites. The changes have been implements in response to the Parliamentary Inquiry into Companion Animal Breeding Practices The changes help people looking to buy a cot or dog search the NSW Pet Registry to see the animal’s: breed sex age whether it is desexed whether or not it is already registered whether any annual permit is in place (from 1 July 2019). A breeder identification number search will also display any business name listed in the registry. This enables buyers to do further research and make information purchasing decisions.  It also helps to promote responsible cat and dog breeding and selling and, over time, enable enforcement agencies to use this information to identify ‘problem’ breeders to enforce animal welfare laws. Please see the NSW Department of Primary Industries website for further...

Consultation on Standards & Guidelines for the Health and Welfare of Dogs in WA

The Western Australian Government recognises the value of animal welfare to the community and strives to ensure that all animals receive appropriate standards of care. As companions and working animals, dogs have an important place in the lives of many Western Australians. Draft Standards and Guidelines for the Health and Welfare of Dogs in WA (Dog Standards and Guidelines) are being developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, in consultation with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Western Australia (RSPCA) and other experts in dog care and welfare. The document sets out the minimum standards that owners and people in charge of dogs must follow to ensure the health and welfare of dogs kept in WA. It also provides guidelines and additional information to promote the health and welfare of dogs. The recommendations are based on current scientific knowledge and generally reflect recommended industry practice and community expectations, as appropriate. The development of dog standards supports the Government’s election commitment to the Stop Puppy Farming initiative, which includes the introduction of Mandatory Standards for Dog Breeding, Housing, Husbandry, Transport and Sale. More information on the Stop Puppy Farming project can be found on the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries website. Following consultation, regulations on dog health and welfare may be drafted and adopted under the Animal Welfare Act 2002. Before drafting regulations, the department invites Western Australians to comment on the draft Dog Standards and Guidelines. Having your say You are encouraged to provide your feedback via an online survey, which takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. The results...

Great potential for motivated couple – Dog Walking & Pet Sitting Business for sale – Inner West Sydney

What does your dream life look like?   Being your own boss, building a great business, ability to own you own home, start a family, travel?   This business has the potential to give you all you have dreamed of and more.   A reputable brand for over 15 years, approximately 400 regular clients, a profit to owner of approximately $125,000 after add backs.  The business has the possibility of expanding into other growing suburbs, adding additional services (dog training, grooming, boarding or day care) and continuing to build a great team. This is the ideal opportunity for a couple wanting to work from a home base, with the possibility to Franchise. If you have a passion for animals this is your dream business. The current owner of nine years has 3 casual staff, can demonstrate year on year growth and is happy to provide full training to the successful buyer for a smooth transition. The business is being sold with the following items: * Training manuals * Specialised software with Client Portal allowing on line booking by existing clients, * Complete CRM package * Social media accounts * Uniforms * Branded Dog leads, * Business cards, * Fridge magnets * 400 regular clients CALL TODAY TO DISCUSS THIS FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY CONTACT THE AGENT FOR MORE INFORMATION: GUNEEV SINGH 0421 038 139...

Animal Care Team Supervisor @Heathcote NSW

Animal Care Team Supervisor @ Heathcote NSW Do you have experience in managing and mentoring people ? Are you reliable, focus on attention to detail, value hygiene and cleanliness? Do you have experience in animal services ? Hanrob Pet Hotels is Australia’s largest and most successful domestic animal training and pet care organisation. We are currently seeking a Pet Welfare Supervisor at our Heathcote facility in the south of Sydney. If you have experience working with animals, a genuine affection for dogs and cats, and have supervisory experience, we would love to hear from you. This position works Thursday to Monday. The Pet Welfare Supervisor is responsible for: Coaching, mentoring and directing all pet welfare staff Planning the team’s daily activities, coordinating and overseeing all aspects of kennel operations to ensure the highest quality of pet welfare and care Delivery of client services and communications that exceed client expectations Issues management (monitoring, communicating and resolving) Identifying animals for veterinary examination Adhering to and ensuring staff are complying with Hanrob Pet Hotels’ operating procedures and work health and safety requirements Identifying and implementing continuous improvement initiatives The successful candidate MUST: Offer proven ability as a team leader Display excellent communication and organising skills Work with attention to detail Demonstrate initiative Bring with them experience in working with animals Hold a current driver’s licence Have Microsoft Excel and Word skills If the above resonates with you, please email your cover letter and resume to John McGann, Sydney Operations Manager,...

Qualified Senior Dog Trainer, FULL TIME @ Duffys Forest

Qualified Senior Dog Trainer, FULL TIME @ Duffys Forest Are you skilled at interpreting and improving canine behaviour? Are you passionate in training dogs so they have a well socialised, obedient and enjoyable life? Do you love working with pet owners to educate them on how to manage their dogs? Hanrob Pet Hotel Services include Dog Training Academies at each Australian location, offering pet owners with peace of mind in high quality dog training services where trainers provide dogs and their owners with a positive lifetime experience. We are currently in search of an Experienced and Qualified Senior Dog Trainer at our Duffys Forest Pet Hotel, on the northern side of Sydney in a full time capacity. We are committed to building a strong bond between owners and their dogs. Our methodology encompasses all facets of classical and operant conditioning techniques. Based on the latest research and being leaders in providing nationally recognised Companion Animal tertiary education, we continuously refine our programs to successfully alleviate the underlying causes of a dog’s undesirable behaviour and improve their quality of life. Our dog training programs offer our customers: Industry Experts Personalised Training Success for Short and Long Term Goals Monitoring of the Training Plan; and Building a Relationship with both the pet and their owner.   About the Job This role is responsible for the following: Behavioural modification for dogs in structured training programs; Managing and delivering quality outcomes for each of our training programs – Stay and Learn Programs, Home Dog Training, Group Classes and Individual one on one sessions; Educating dog owners to successfully maintain our training schedule to ensure ongoing success in the...

Service NSW can now register dogs and cats

Service NSW can now register dogs and cats The NSW Government is pleased to announce that Service NSW has been added to the list of registration agents to give pet owners an additional, convenient option to register their pets.  Dog and cat owners across the State can now register their pets through Service NSW, as well as at their local council, Animal Welfare League, Cat Protection Society or online at the NSW Pet Registry. Eligible pet owners will be able to register their pets with Service NSW in person at a Service NSW centre or kiosk or online using their MyServiceNSW account, which will link customers with their NSW Pet Registry account.  Making pet registration easier supports the NSW Government’s aim of increasing the proportion of registered cats and dogs and improving companion animal management and welfare outcomes. All registration fees go directly into the Companion Animal Fund. This will also apply to fees collected by Service NSW. Money collected goes straight back to the community by funding companion animal services including: Council pounds/shelters Ranger services Dog recreation areas Education and awareness activities Responsible pet ownership initiatives. New and improved NSW Pet Registry Last year the Office of Local Government made some significant updates to the NSW Pet Registry to enable a fresh look, easier navigation and great new features. The upgraded website makes it easier to register pets, return lost animals to their owners and enables access to useful data for people thinking of buying a pet. Here are the changes at a glance: Create/add a litter – This allows pet breeders to create a litter and add offspring, making it easier for vets...

Experienced Dog Groomer/Stylist required – Slacks Creek QLD

We are looking for a full-time or part time experienced dog groomer/stylist to join our fun and friendly team in our 5-star luxury salon, spa, boutique and daycare. The applicant must fit the following criteria: All breed grooming experience 3+ years •Must be competent with hand scissoring and have a gentle approach when handling our pampered pooches. •Great communication skills •Friendly and positive attitude •Passionate about dogs •A team player •Available Mon-Fri and Late-night Thursdays – no weekends •Bonus Scheme is also available along with an attractive salary Pooch Avenue is QLD’s first luxury salon and day spa for dogs. We are located between Brisbane city and the Gold Coast. Opening in 2009 we have led the way in the industry and provide a luxury grooming environment and a luxury experience to our pooches. We have an organic and holistic approach with our product range and provide luxury services to our clients. If you would love to join our award-winning team and If this sounds like you send your resume through today 1300 994 334 info@poochavenue.com.au www.poochavenue.com.au check out our facebook and instagram as well....

Keeping your pets safe from snake bites this summer

In the warmer summer months, snakes become much more active and pet owners need to be careful and safeguard their pets from snake bites, plus look out for the warning signs should an animal be bitten. Dogs will often try to chase or kill snakes resulting in snake bites usually to the dog’s face and legs. Cats, being hunters and chasing anything that moves, are also quite susceptible to snake bites. The sort of reaction your pet has to a snake bite is determined by a number of factors: the type of snake, the amount of venom injected and the site of the snake bite. Generally the closer the bite is to the heart the quicker the venom spreads to the rest of the body. In addition, at the beginning of summer, snakes’ venom glands are fuller and their bites are much more severe. The tiger and brown snake are responsible for most of the snake bites in domestic pets. The tiger snakes have a bite that can be fatal to not only pets but humans. Brown snake venom is milder than the tiger snake’s. These snakes have a toxin that causes paralysis and also have an agent in them that uses up all the clotting factors that helps to stop your pet from bleeding. Tiger snakes also have a toxin that breaks down muscle causing damage to the kidneys. Signs of snake bite include: Sudden weakness followed by collapse Shaking or twitching of the muscles and difficulty blinking Vomiting Loss of bladder and bowel control Dilated pupils Paralysis Blood in urine. If you think your pet has been...

Pets assisting in our better management of mental health disorders

The positive effects that pets have on people have been well-researched. From research conducted by the University of Manchester1 suggests that pets can help people who are living with a mental illness to manage their condition. President of the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA), Dr Paula Parker says: “the human-animal bond plays a crucial and positive role in the health and wellbeing of the community”. “Benefits can include companionship, health and social improvements and assistance for people with special needs. “This research takes our knowledge about the human-animal bond a step further suggesting that pets can help people who are struggling with a serious mental illness to manage their mental health. “Only through more research like this, can we come to better understand just how increasingly valuable animals are to an individual’s wellbeing and the community,” she said. The study involved 54 participants with a severe mental illness, for example, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Twenty-five of the participants identified a pet as being important in the everyday management of their illness. What’s more, of these 25 participants, more than half identified their pet as being one of the most important things to them in managing their mental health. “There’s already strong evidence to indicate that owning a pet brings health benefits including physical health benefits, for example, dog owners increase their exercise by walking their pet. “Research also suggests that pets have positive effects on the community. A study2 conducted by the University of Western Australia found that pets facilitate first meetings and conversations between neighbours, with over 60 per cent of dog owners reporting that they got to know...

Animal welfare Standards & Guidelines for breeding dogs & their progeny – Qld Dept of Agriculture & Fisheries

The Palaszczuk Government is committed to promoting the responsible breeding of dogs and ensuring action can be taken against breeders for irresponsible dog breeding practices. The next step is to introduce the Queensland Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Breeding Dogs and their Progeny (Standards and Guidelines) from 1 October 2018. The Standards and Guidelines describe appropriate care, management, shelter and socialisation of breeding dogs. The Standards are mandatory requirements and the Guidelines are advice on recommended practices to achieve desirable animal welfare outcomes. These Standards and Guidelines complement the 2017 introduction of compulsory dog breeder registration. The new Standards are compulsory code provisions under the Queensland Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 (Act) from 1 October 2018. All dog breeders, including those breeding pets, working dogs, hunting dogs or breeding dogs for commercial purposes are subject to the new Standards. Those breeders who are already caring for their breeding dogs in responsible and appropriate ways should not be significantly impacted by the new Standards. Those breeders not meeting the new Standards of care, management, shelter, socialisation or housing will have to be improve upon their practices in order to comply. The new Standards and Guidelines may be a useful tool for pet shop owners to assess whether a puppy supplier is breeding dogs responsibly. More information  Copies of the Standards and Guidelines and advice will be publicly available from 1 October 2018 from: The Queensland government website: www.business.qld.gov.au The Customer Service Centre of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries by: Phone: 13 25 23 (cost of a local call within Queensland) 8 am to 5 pm Monday, Tuesday,...

Consider your pet’s mental health this Mental Health Week

During this Mental Health Week, the peak body for veterinarians, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) is reminding pet owners that like humans, pets can suffer from mental illness and it’s important that we keep a watchful eye on the mental health of not just people, but also their pets. Spokesperson for the AVA and veterinary behaviour specialist, Dr Jacqui Ley, says that psychiatry is part of veterinary science because much like humans, animals too can develop mental health disorders and it’s important to diagnose them and commence treatment as early as possible. “While there is no hard evidence on the rate of mental illness in animals, it’s reasonable to conclude that statistically it’s the same as in humans – that is, one in five suffer from a mental health condition. Given the number of pets that end up in shelters because of a behaviour-related problem, one in five is certainly a reasonable, possibly conservative statistic. “The key is for pet owners to seek veterinary advice if they notice unusual behaviour in their pet. Some dog owners go direct to a trainer for help, but your veterinarian should always be the first port of call. They will then be able to advise on next steps,” she said. In dogs, mental illness commonly manifests in the form of: aggression towards people or animals fears and phobias, for example of thunderstorms compulsion such as tail or shadow chasing cognitive decline in older dogs. Dr Ley says that as dogs age, it’s normal to expect the brain to slow down a bit, but some are developing serious cognitive health conditions such as dementia...
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