Keeping your pets safe from snake bites this summer

In the warmer summer months, snakes become much more active and pet owners need to be careful and safeguard their pets from snake bites, plus look out for the warning signs should an animal be bitten. Dogs will often try to chase or kill snakes resulting in snake bites usually to the dog’s face and legs. Cats, being hunters and chasing anything that moves, are also quite susceptible to snake bites. The sort of reaction your pet has to a snake bite is determined by a number of factors: the type of snake, the amount of venom injected and the site of the snake bite. Generally the closer the bite is to the heart the quicker the venom spreads to the rest of the body. In addition, at the beginning of summer, snakes’ venom glands are fuller and their bites are much more severe. The tiger and brown snake are responsible for most of the snake bites in domestic pets. The tiger snakes have a bite that can be fatal to not only pets but humans. Brown snake venom is milder than the tiger snake’s. These snakes have a toxin that causes paralysis and also have an agent in them that uses up all the clotting factors that helps to stop your pet from bleeding. Tiger snakes also have a toxin that breaks down muscle causing damage to the kidneys. Signs of snake bite include: Sudden weakness followed by collapse Shaking or twitching of the muscles and difficulty blinking Vomiting Loss of bladder and bowel control Dilated pupils Paralysis Blood in urine. If you think your pet has been...

Pets assisting in our better management of mental health disorders

The positive effects that pets have on people have been well-researched. From research conducted by the University of Manchester1 suggests that pets can help people who are living with a mental illness to manage their condition. President of the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA), Dr Paula Parker says: “the human-animal bond plays a crucial and positive role in the health and wellbeing of the community”. “Benefits can include companionship, health and social improvements and assistance for people with special needs. “This research takes our knowledge about the human-animal bond a step further suggesting that pets can help people who are struggling with a serious mental illness to manage their mental health. “Only through more research like this, can we come to better understand just how increasingly valuable animals are to an individual’s wellbeing and the community,” she said. The study involved 54 participants with a severe mental illness, for example, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Twenty-five of the participants identified a pet as being important in the everyday management of their illness. What’s more, of these 25 participants, more than half identified their pet as being one of the most important things to them in managing their mental health. “There’s already strong evidence to indicate that owning a pet brings health benefits including physical health benefits, for example, dog owners increase their exercise by walking their pet. “Research also suggests that pets have positive effects on the community. A study2 conducted by the University of Western Australia found that pets facilitate first meetings and conversations between neighbours, with over 60 per cent of dog owners reporting that they got to know...

Animal welfare Standards & Guidelines for breeding dogs & their progeny – Qld Dept of Agriculture & Fisheries

The Palaszczuk Government is committed to promoting the responsible breeding of dogs and ensuring action can be taken against breeders for irresponsible dog breeding practices. The next step is to introduce the Queensland Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Breeding Dogs and their Progeny (Standards and Guidelines) from 1 October 2018. The Standards and Guidelines describe appropriate care, management, shelter and socialisation of breeding dogs. The Standards are mandatory requirements and the Guidelines are advice on recommended practices to achieve desirable animal welfare outcomes. These Standards and Guidelines complement the 2017 introduction of compulsory dog breeder registration. The new Standards are compulsory code provisions under the Queensland Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 (Act) from 1 October 2018. All dog breeders, including those breeding pets, working dogs, hunting dogs or breeding dogs for commercial purposes are subject to the new Standards. Those breeders who are already caring for their breeding dogs in responsible and appropriate ways should not be significantly impacted by the new Standards. Those breeders not meeting the new Standards of care, management, shelter, socialisation or housing will have to be improve upon their practices in order to comply. The new Standards and Guidelines may be a useful tool for pet shop owners to assess whether a puppy supplier is breeding dogs responsibly. More information  Copies of the Standards and Guidelines and advice will be publicly available from 1 October 2018 from: The Queensland government website: www.business.qld.gov.au The Customer Service Centre of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries by: Phone: 13 25 23 (cost of a local call within Queensland) 8 am to 5 pm Monday, Tuesday,...

Consider your pet’s mental health this Mental Health Week

During this Mental Health Week, the peak body for veterinarians, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) is reminding pet owners that like humans, pets can suffer from mental illness and it’s important that we keep a watchful eye on the mental health of not just people, but also their pets. Spokesperson for the AVA and veterinary behaviour specialist, Dr Jacqui Ley, says that psychiatry is part of veterinary science because much like humans, animals too can develop mental health disorders and it’s important to diagnose them and commence treatment as early as possible. “While there is no hard evidence on the rate of mental illness in animals, it’s reasonable to conclude that statistically it’s the same as in humans – that is, one in five suffer from a mental health condition. Given the number of pets that end up in shelters because of a behaviour-related problem, one in five is certainly a reasonable, possibly conservative statistic. “The key is for pet owners to seek veterinary advice if they notice unusual behaviour in their pet. Some dog owners go direct to a trainer for help, but your veterinarian should always be the first port of call. They will then be able to advise on next steps,” she said. In dogs, mental illness commonly manifests in the form of: aggression towards people or animals fears and phobias, for example of thunderstorms compulsion such as tail or shadow chasing cognitive decline in older dogs. Dr Ley says that as dogs age, it’s normal to expect the brain to slow down a bit, but some are developing serious cognitive health conditions such as dementia...

Grooming Stylist Required – Beau’s Pet Hotel

Casual position with flexible hours Values driven organisation, fun & supportive team environment Adelaide Airport precinct location Beau’s is a state of the art Pet Hotel that offers a safe and loving holiday experience for pets, offering both standard and luxury accommodation for cats and dogs, as well as high quality grooming services. Beau’s is conveniently located in the Adelaide Airport precinct. All profits from Beau’s Pet Hotel are returned to Guide Dogs SA/NT to enhance the lives of people living with disability. We are seeking an experienced, self-motivated Groomer to provide consistently high quality dog grooming services to Beau’s growing clientele. Our Groomers will offer exceptional service and education to customers and develop lasting relationships with a strong focus on developing annual dog grooming management programs.  They are also responsible for providing high quality grooming services across a variety of breeds including bathing, drying, nail clipping, ear cleaning, brushing, combing, de-sheds, sanitary trims, scissoring, full clips, parasite control and other ‘a la carte’ grooming services as required. It is important to us that our Groomers have a minimum of 2 years’ experience and can demonstrate strong interpersonal skills. Beau’s is a positive reinforcement environment and our groomers are required to use a reward based methodology. For a copy of the Position Description, click here. Please send us your resume and cover letter addressing the requirements of the Position Description to: jobs@beaus.org.au. A Police Check is...

Fair Work Ombudsman – change in position for pet groomers employed by pet grooming businesses.

Following a decision of a Full Bench of the Fair Work Commission earlier this year, the Fair Work Ombudsman has had to change its view on certain coverage issues relating to the Miscellaneous Award. In the decision, United Voice v Gold Coast Kennels Discretionary Trust t/a AAA Pet Resort [2018] FCWFB 128, the Full Bench adopted a narrower interpretation of occupations that are excluded from coverage under the Miscellaneous Award than has been understood to apply. Importantly for pet groomers employed by pet grooming businesses, this has resulted in a change in position regarding the Fair Work Ombudsman’s (FWO’s) advice concerning award coverage for this occupation. The FWO has today published updated advice regarding award coverage for employees working as pet groomers for a pet grooming business. Please see our Library article Award coverage for pet groomers. Background to the change If an employee is not covered by an industry or occupation-based award, they may be covered by the Miscellaneous Award. Determining coverage under the Miscellaneous Award can be complex and, until recently, there has been limited guidance from a Court or Tribunal about how the coverage provisions in the award are intended to operate. On 12 January 2018, a Full Bench of the Fair Work Commission handed down a decision, United Voice v Gold Coast Kennels Discretionary Trust t/a AAA Pet Resort [2018] FCWFB 128, which took a broader approach to considering the exemption under clause 4.2 of the Award. The Full Bench found that employees will not be covered if they have not traditionally been regulated because they are a manager or a ‘specialist white collar professional’.[1]...

World Rabies day is on September 28

Australian animal charity shares a vital message on World Rabies Day Dog-mediated virus 99% fatal, 100% preventable World Rabies Day is on September 28 and Australian-based international animal charity Vets Beyond Borders is embracing this year’s awareness theme by bringing this deadly dog-mediated disease to Australia’s attention. “Rabies kills thousands of people around the world every year. It is nearly always fatal - only a few people in the world have survived treatment. But it’s 100 per cent preventable by vaccination,” said Maryann Dalton, CEO of Vets Beyond Borders (VBB). Rabies infection is caused by the rabies virus, which is spread through the saliva of infected animals by biting another animal or a person, and it is always fatal once clinical symptoms appear. Australia is free of rabies, but tragically the virus kills approximately 59,000 people every year – 40 per cent children in Asia and Africa¹. Rabies also causes financial hardship when people have to pay for vaccination after bite wounds.  An estimated more than 5.5 billion people live at daily risk of rabies². World Rabies Day is created and coordinated annually by Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC) and is the first and only global day of action and awareness for rabies prevention. This year’s theme is Rabies: Share the message. Save a life and highlights the importance of education and awareness to prevent rabies.  Click here for GARC World Rabies Day awareness events in Australia. “Dog bites cause almost all human cases of rabies. We can prevent rabies deaths through increased awareness, vaccinating dogs to prevent disease at its source, and timely life-saving post-bite treatment for people,” said Ms Dalton. Through...

Act now and put a tick prevention plan in place for pets

With the warm weather now in play and the high season for ticks, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) is encouraging pet owners to talk to their veterinarian now about ways to prevent serious harm or death from toxic ticks. President of the AVA Dr Paula Parker said that as the weather warms up, dog and cat owners need to be vigilant, particularly in tick prone areas.  “Ticks breed mainly along the east coast of Australia in warm and humid weather so now is the time for pet owners to ensure they take preventive measures to avoid what can sometimes be a fatal outcome,” she said. We now have highly effective, safe, APVMA approved tick preventatives for dogs and cats. Pet owners should speak to their local vet who can advise on the best prevention method for their situation and type of pet. “Paralysis ticks tend to attach to the head and neck area of the pet and on the chest and the front of the leg but can generally be found on any part of the body. Ticks release a toxin when they feed, which leads to a condition known as tick paralysis. Common signs of tick paralysis include difficulty walking, gurgling and choking. Dogs may not be able to bark properly.” Dr Parker said that ideally pet owners should check dogs and cats regularly by running their hands over the animal to feel for anything unusual. “In cats, ticks often latch around the neck where they can’t groom, so it’s important to pay special attention to this area. If you think your pet has a tick the best course...

Attention to Aquaculture Association Members – Australia Wide

Use of formaldehyde in aquaculture - compliance with permit conditions. Parafarm hold a permit to enable the use of formaldehyde in aquaculture.  The permit is held with the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA).  The APVMA has sent a letter to Parafarm, and expressed great concern of how formaldehyde is being used in compliance with the Minor Use Permit issued by them.  This letter (see below link) contains information on how to ensure your industry groups or members complies with the MUP. In short, this requires completion of accreditation with Parafarm - there is no cost. Veterinary supervision of the use of formaldehyde appears to also require upgrading.  Parafarm has also been communicating with industry veterinarians. If the APVMA requests a listing of Parafarm accreditied members, this will be supplied.  Parafarm has tried to make accreditation as simple as possible.  If you are using formaldehyde and your name is not on the list (see below link) which means Parafarm has not accredited you formally, then the APVMA may take legal action against you. Please click here to view the original letter from the APVMA explaining their reasons for their contact.  There is also simple detail on how accreditation is obtained. If you have any questions, please contact Grant Richards from Allfarm Animal Health on 03 5979 4488...

Study shows owner misconceptions about their cats lifestyle may be placing their pets at risk.

Australians may think their indoor cats are safe and protected inside their homes, but research reveals that 83% of Australian cats have some level of outdoor access, which increases their risk of traumatic injuries, and their exposure to infectious and parasitic diseases. To mark International Cat Day, the Have We Seen Your Cat Lately? Program is putting the spotlight on the hidden health risks Australian cat owners may not be aware of. A recently conducted Feline Lifestyle Study*, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, showed that 66% of cat owners described their cats as having outdoor access, while 34% said their cats were indoor only. However, further questioning revealed that more than half of these “indoor only” cats actually had outdoor access. In total, 83% of pet cats had some form of outdoor access during their lives.1 Media Release - Have we seen your cat lately...

Charity supporting people and pets in need urgently seeking new site in Melbourne

On any given night in Australia, 1 in 200 are homeless. Today, 22,773 people are experiencing homelessness in Victoria* Pets in the Park (PITP) has been operating in central Melbourne since 2016, providing free veterinary care for much-loved animal companions of people struggling with homelessness. Today, PITP Central Melbourne clinic are seeking a new venue themselves due to demolition and development work. This means they can no longer use their current location and cannot operate until they find a new site. “We knew that this location was always on borrowed time, but it came as a real surprise how quickly it happened and that’s no one’s fault. We are so grateful for the support from Wesley Church who were able to provide this location for two years,” said PITP Director Dr Mark Kelman.  Many people struggling with homelessness lead a difficult and isolated life, particularly those who struggle with depression, anxiety and other mental health problems. But for those with pets, their companion animals act as their refuge and give many a reason to live. “For many homeless people, having a pet provides the unconditional love, companionship, emotional support and security that they’re unable to find elsewhere,” said Dr Kelman. However, although pet ownership greatly enriches the quality of life of those who are experiencing homelessness, it can at times come at a significant financial cost and result in the forfeiting of personal welfare. This is where Pets in the Park comes in to help! PITP’s volunteer veterinarians and veterinary nurses provide free veterinary care at health clinics and quarterly desexing clinics for much-loved animal companions of people struggling with homelessness across...

August is Pet Dental Health Month

August is Pet Dental Health Month and pet owners are being encouraged to speak to their veterinarian about what they can do to ensure their pet maintains good oral health. Dental disease is common in Australian pets. If left untreated, it can be painful and lead to serious health concerns. Dr Tara Cashman, spokesperson for the AVA, said Pet Dental Month highlights the importance of good oral health in pets and its impact on the overall health of an animal. It also raises awareness of the need for yearly thorough dental exams performed by a veterinarian to identify any emerging dental issues. “Dental disease occurs above and below the gum line. It’s extremely difficult to get a full picture of what’s going on in a pet’s mouth when it is conscious because disease below the gum line can’t be seen. “To properly examine, diagnose and treat dental disease in pets, it must be done by a veterinarian while the animal is anaesthetised. This ensures the experience is a positive one for the pet because it is unaware of pain during the procedure and does not need to be physically restrained. “A general anaesthetic also ensures the veterinarian can complete a thorough inspection of every single tooth above and below the gum line and address any problems on the spot. This is not possible to do effectively on a fully conscious patient,” Dr Cashman said. In its early stages, gum disease or gingivitis is reversible. However, if left undetected it may progress to periodontitis which can impact heavily on a pet’s quality of life. The longer it’s left untreated, the...
X

Forgot Password?

Join Us